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Rat Loving Cat Show CatsConfidentially ...Woman Leaves $ to Cats
Sailor Cap Bed
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April 10, 1941
"Taint nature--but it's true."

Los Angeles Times
Yow Yow, a gray tabby cat, kills the mother and father of six baby rats. Yow Yow brings the baby rats back home to play with her three kittens at 453 North Mission Road. As Yow Yow carries the rats one-by-one to their new home, she spies a mouse on the street. She puts down the baby rat and eats the mouse. Then she picks up the baby rat and continues home. Both the kittens and baby rats sleep together. Yow Yow even nurses the rat babies. According to the Times: "Feeding time found kittens and rodents sharing alike and the purring mother nursing her greatly augmented family."

April 18, 1942
Cat Deposits Four Kitten in Cap

Los Angeles Times
William Fitzpatrick, yeoman third class U.S.N. stationed in Los Angeles, thinks he hears a squeak in his 1935 Sedan. He notices the noise persists even when the car is not on. After a nearly exhaustive search, Fitzpatrick finds mother cat Patsy and four kittens in the rear seat resting in his clean white sea-going cap. "Fitzpatrick made arrangements with the attendant to provide raw liver and milk for the mother cat," while he continues his work building ships.

May 19, 1943
Cat Has Haven Ready When Quints Arrive

Los Angeles Times
Mitzi, a pregnant alley cat, looks for a delivery place far away from her guardian Mrs. Anna Silverman’s bulldog Mike of 107 South Benton Way. Mike is notorious for stealing Mitzi's food from her pan. Mitzi finds a perfect place outside Mrs. Bion Vogel’s house on 101 South Benton Way, high out of the reach of her tormentor. After the blessed births do occur, Laddie, Mrs. Vogel’s cocker spaniel, dubbed a "hero," notices the newborn kittens and notifies the neighborhood with yaps and yips. And so, "the happy ending--our heroine and her family safe and our hero proud and gallant, the housing problem solved and our villain sulking dourly."

October 8, 1944
Confidentially

Los Angeles Times
The Times announces under the "Confidentially" column that Petunia is the cat who had her five kittens in a locked drawer of the information desk at Union Station. "Petunia made up her mind it would be the perfect nursery for her little family." Petunia and her family are adopted by a group of servicemen and she will be heading off on a destroyer to help fight World War II.

July 7, 1944
Woman Leaves $1,000 to Two Cats Belonging to Neighbors

Los Angeles Times
Eliza Anderson lives next door to The Kendalls of 1217 West 91st Street and leaves $1,000 to the neighbor's cats when writing her will on December 4, 1940. "Over a period of five years she enjoyed the animals." Miss Anderson also left the Kendalls $250 for "walking with me when I tried too hard to get about."

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